Blogging Archaeology #2

Time for episode two of the Blogging Archaeology blog carnival. You can see the synthesis of the first set of responses on Doug’s Archaeology blog. The next set of questions are: The Good– what has been good about blogging. I know some people in their ‘why blogging’ posts mentioned creating networks and getting asked to …

Blogging Archaeology

Ok, so what is Blogging Archaeology all about? it’s a blog carnival being held in advance of a session Blogging and Archaeology at the forthcoming Society for American Archaeology conference. It’s an opportunity to take a step back and think about the hows and whys of archaeological blogging. Each month before the conference, Doug Rocks-MacQueen, …

Jack in the Green, Iffley

Just wanted to share this splendid picture of the Jack in the Green ceremony at Iffley, Oxford. Photograph taken from the excellent Oxfordshire History Centre website. Photo taken in 1886 by William Taunt- who took lots of wonderful early photographs of the Oxfordshire area including some of the Headington Quarry morris side dating to before …

where it all begins

The other week I caught a documentary on Radio 4 by Stuart Lee about the mid-1970s children’s television programme Children of the Stones. Set around a stone circle that was clearly based on Avebury, it explored For a children’s drama it was surprisingly sophisticated and surprisingly scary. It was a programme I must have seen …

Archaeology, jobs and roads

Honestly, you write a blog post and then before you know it, six months have passed and it’s time to write another! Couple of things caught my eye recently- most recently was the government announcing plans to revive a series of road building schemes that had been shelved, seemingly funded somehow by a combination of …

Archaeology and psychogeography

I’m not going to be able to reach this year’s TAG in Birmingham this year, which is a shame as I’d really like to have gone to the session Psychoarchaeology being organised by Kenneth Brophy and Vicky Cumming. I have always been surprised how little archaeologists have engaged with the notion of psychogeography. Like many …